27. January 2011 · Comments Off on Philosophy of science and life extension · Categories: Science · Tags: , , , ,

Paul Edwards concludes his chapter ‘The Semantic Challenge’ in his book God and the Philosophers with the following observation about logical positivism:

It is not uncommon nowadays to hear logical positivism dismissed as a set of crude errors and confusions. This is done with an air condescension by philosophers whose writings are usually models of obscurity. To people of my generation who came to philosophy in the 1940s, when traditional metaphysicians  were a dominating force, logical positivism was a liberating movement. Occasionally the leading figures were guilty of dogmatism, and on some important issues, such as the mind body problem and the question of free will, the logical positivists made no significant contributions, but the main doctrines seem to me substantially sound. The verification principle in particular, when stated with suitable amendments, is a powerful weapon against pretentious humbug.

Do life extensionists need to take an interest in philosophy of science and metaphysics? In his review of James Ladyman and Don Ross’s Every Thing Must Go: Metaphysics Naturalized, Alcor staff member Mike Perry notes that “as immortalists we hope to be in the world for a good long while, thus we are interested in the nature of reality. Reality determines, among other things, what our prospects are for our own longterm survival.”

Alternatively, one could argue that metaphysics is not a theoretically legitimate discipline and that the verifiable claims of physics exhaust what we can say about “reality.” Perhaps the most useful benefit of familiarizing oneself with philosophy of science and analytic philosophy is that it enables one to get a better appreciation of the difference between meaningful experimental science and sweeping generalizations deduced from shaky metaphysics.

Further reading: Five important empiricist philosophy books

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