01. March 2012 · Comments Off · Categories: Cryonics, Neuroscience

Conventional wisdom in life extension circles is that making cryonics arrangements allows one to benefit from rejuvenation technologies that are not available during one’s existing lifespan. Aside from the risk of high-impact accidents or getting lost at sea, there is one challenge that some cryonicists will face when they grow older; the debilitating consequences of brain-threatening disorders.

One of the unfortunate effects of the increase in human lifespan is a corresponding increase in late-onset identity-destroying brain disorders. We know that some patients at the existing cryonics organizations were cryopreserved after advanced Alzheimer’s disease. Some cryonics organization members who developed Alzheimer’s disease were not preserved at all, due to lapsed insurance and/or cryopreservation arrangements.

The growing awareness that brain-threatening disorders can present a formidable challenge to personal survival is the theme of the latest issue of Alcor’s Cryonics magazine.

To further draw attention to this topic and generate more knowledge how to prevent and treat brain-threatening disorders, the Institute for Evidence Based Cryonics and Cryonics Northwest will organize a symposium on cryonics and brain-threatening disorders on Saturday July 7, 2012, in Portland, Oregon.

Talks include Aubrey de Grey on The SENS approach to repairing the aging brain, Chana de Wolf on neurogenesis in the adult brain and Alzheimer’s disease, Ben Best on drugs, supplements, and other treatments to mitigate and prevent Alzheimer’s disease, Mike Perry on (early) diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, and Max More about survival, identity, and the extended mind. Entrance to the symposium is free. More information about the program and registration will be provided soon.

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